Organic Sour Cookies (Flower)

Rating: 0.00/10
AKA:
Brand: 1964
  • THC

    20 - 26%

Order Cannabis Delivery

No Cannabis store nearby this product

What is Organic Sour Cookies?

This sativa-dominant hybrid was born from Girl Scout Cookies and Sour Diesel Featuring beautiful bright purple leaves, the fresh and perfectly moist buds glisten off a powerful aroma that is at once sweet and gassy.


Terpene Profile

Terpene Thumnail

Caryophyllene

Best known for its spicy and peppery note, beta-caryophyllene is also found in black pepper, cinnamon, cloves, and spices like oregano, basil and rosemary. Beta-caryophyllene binds to CB2 receptors making it the only terpene that binds to your endocannabinoid receptors. Beta-caryophyllene has also found a niche in the medical and cosmetic industries as an ingredient in anti-inflammatory topicals and creams. Studies have shown that beta-caryophyllene may reduce voluntary intake of alcohol in mice and could be used as a treatment for alcohol withdrawal symptoms.

Terpene Thumnail

Myrcene

Myrcene is one of the most common terpenes found in cannabis and is also the most likely terpene to be dominant in a strain. This terpene has long been used for it's calming sedative effects; however, you will find Myrcene in similar concentrations in both Sativa and Indica dominant strains. You will recognize myrcene from it's peppery, spicy fragrance. It often reminds users of earthy, musky notes, resembling cloves and imparts flavours from floral tang to herbal musk. Myrcene is can also be found in thyme, mango, lemongrass, and hops.

Terpene Thumnail

Ocimene

You may recognize Ocimene for it's sweet, herbaceous, and woody aroma while some also describe it as fruity and slightly citric. Ocimene has long been used in the perfume industry for it's aroma profile but like many other terpenes new information is coming out regarding potential for medicinal application. Ocimene has been found to exhibit anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative properties. Ocimene is also found in hops, kumquats, mangos, basil, bergamot, lavender, orchids, pepper.

Terpene Thumnail

humulene

α-humulene (formerly α-caryophyllene) is partially responsible for giving the plant its distinct spicy, herbaceous, and subtle floral aromas. Humulene can be found along with β-caryophyllene in plants such as basil, sage, hops, and clove. From a medical standpoint a 2016 study found that humulene may assist in termination of cancer cells when used in conjunction with phytocannabinoids and other terpenes. Humulene has been found to exhibit antibacterial properties and plays an important part in the lifecycle of the cannabis plant by deterring pests and preventing fungal infections.

Best known for its spicy and peppery note, beta-caryophyllene is also found in black pepper, cinnamon, cloves, and spices like oregano, basil and rosemary. Beta-caryophyllene binds to CB2 receptors making it the only terpene that binds to your endocannabinoid receptors. Beta-caryophyllene has also found a niche in the medical and cosmetic industries as an ingredient in anti-inflammatory topicals and creams. Studies have shown that beta-caryophyllene may reduce voluntary intake of alcohol in mice and could be used as a treatment for alcohol withdrawal symptoms.

Myrcene is one of the most common terpenes found in cannabis and is also the most likely terpene to be dominant in a strain. This terpene has long been used for it's calming sedative effects; however, you will find Myrcene in similar concentrations in both Sativa and Indica dominant strains. You will recognize myrcene from it's peppery, spicy fragrance. It often reminds users of earthy, musky notes, resembling cloves and imparts flavours from floral tang to herbal musk. Myrcene is can also be found in thyme, mango, lemongrass, and hops.

You may recognize Ocimene for it's sweet, herbaceous, and woody aroma while some also describe it as fruity and slightly citric. Ocimene has long been used in the perfume industry for it's aroma profile but like many other terpenes new information is coming out regarding potential for medicinal application. Ocimene has been found to exhibit anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative properties. Ocimene is also found in hops, kumquats, mangos, basil, bergamot, lavender, orchids, pepper.

α-humulene (formerly α-caryophyllene) is partially responsible for giving the plant its distinct spicy, herbaceous, and subtle floral aromas. Humulene can be found along with β-caryophyllene in plants such as basil, sage, hops, and clove. From a medical standpoint a 2016 study found that humulene may assist in termination of cancer cells when used in conjunction with phytocannabinoids and other terpenes. Humulene has been found to exhibit antibacterial properties and plays an important part in the lifecycle of the cannabis plant by deterring pests and preventing fungal infections.

Terpene Detail Thumnail

Caryophyllene

Best known for its spicy and peppery note, beta-caryophyllene is also found in black pepper, cinnamon, cloves, and spices like oregano, basil and rosemary. Beta-caryophyllene binds to CB2 receptors making it the only terpene that binds to your endocannabinoid receptors. Beta-caryophyllene has also found a niche in the medical and cosmetic industries as an ingredient in anti-inflammatory topicals and creams. Studies have shown that beta-caryophyllene may reduce voluntary intake of alcohol in mice and could be used as a treatment for alcohol withdrawal symptoms.

Terpene Detail Thumnail

Myrcene

Myrcene is one of the most common terpenes found in cannabis and is also the most likely terpene to be dominant in a strain. This terpene has long been used for it's calming sedative effects; however, you will find Myrcene in similar concentrations in both Sativa and Indica dominant strains. You will recognize myrcene from it's peppery, spicy fragrance. It often reminds users of earthy, musky notes, resembling cloves and imparts flavours from floral tang to herbal musk. Myrcene is can also be found in thyme, mango, lemongrass, and hops.

Terpene Detail Thumnail

Ocimene

You may recognize Ocimene for it's sweet, herbaceous, and woody aroma while some also describe it as fruity and slightly citric. Ocimene has long been used in the perfume industry for it's aroma profile but like many other terpenes new information is coming out regarding potential for medicinal application. Ocimene has been found to exhibit anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative properties. Ocimene is also found in hops, kumquats, mangos, basil, bergamot, lavender, orchids, pepper.

Terpene Detail Thumnail

humulene

α-humulene (formerly α-caryophyllene) is partially responsible for giving the plant its distinct spicy, herbaceous, and subtle floral aromas. Humulene can be found along with β-caryophyllene in plants such as basil, sage, hops, and clove. From a medical standpoint a 2016 study found that humulene may assist in termination of cancer cells when used in conjunction with phytocannabinoids and other terpenes. Humulene has been found to exhibit antibacterial properties and plays an important part in the lifecycle of the cannabis plant by deterring pests and preventing fungal infections.