Headband (Flower)

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AKA:
Brand: pure sunfarms
  • THC

    17 - 23%

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What is Headband?

Born in California, but raised in BC, Headband is sought-after for its high THC potential. A hybrid of OG Kush and Sour Diesel, it became popular in Ontario before finding a home in BC’s temperate climate. The dense, elegantly contoured flowers exhibit a range of green colours under a coat of sticky trichomes. Headband offers flavours and scents of sweet and savoury spices including allspice and nutmeg (caryophyllene), lavender (linalool), lemon and coriander seeds (humulene). The combination of these terpenes results in its signature ‘gassy’ smell.


Terpene Profile

Terpene Thumnail

Caryophyllene

Best known for its spicy and peppery note, beta-caryophyllene is also found in black pepper, cinnamon, cloves, and spices like oregano, basil and rosemary. Beta-caryophyllene binds to CB2 receptors making it the only terpene that binds to your endocannabinoid receptors. Beta-caryophyllene has also found a niche in the medical and cosmetic industries as an ingredient in anti-inflammatory topicals and creams. Studies have shown that beta-caryophyllene may reduce voluntary intake of alcohol in mice and could be used as a treatment for alcohol withdrawal symptoms.

Terpene Thumnail

Linalool

This terpene is the most responsible for the recognizable marijuana smell with its spicy and floral notes. Linalool is also found in lavender, mint, cinnamon and coriander. Linalool has strong sedative and relaxing properties just like the aromatic herbs where it is found. Therapeutically, Linalool has been shown to exhibit anti-inflammatory, anti-epileptic, anti-stress, and anti-microbial properties. Finally, if you're looking for a natural mosquito repellant linalool has been shown to act as a strong mosquito deterrent.

Terpene Thumnail

bisabolol

Alpha-bisabolol (also known as levomenol and bisabolol) has a pleasant floral, peppery aroma and can also be found in chamomile flower and candeia tree. This terpene has primarily found its niche in the cosmetics industry, primarily owed to its anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and antioxidant properties.

Terpene Thumnail

humulene

α-humulene (formerly α-caryophyllene) is partially responsible for giving the plant its distinct spicy, herbaceous, and subtle floral aromas. Humulene can be found along with β-caryophyllene in plants such as basil, sage, hops, and clove. From a medical standpoint a 2016 study found that humulene may assist in termination of cancer cells when used in conjunction with phytocannabinoids and other terpenes. Humulene has been found to exhibit antibacterial properties and plays an important part in the lifecycle of the cannabis plant by deterring pests and preventing fungal infections.

Best known for its spicy and peppery note, beta-caryophyllene is also found in black pepper, cinnamon, cloves, and spices like oregano, basil and rosemary. Beta-caryophyllene binds to CB2 receptors making it the only terpene that binds to your endocannabinoid receptors. Beta-caryophyllene has also found a niche in the medical and cosmetic industries as an ingredient in anti-inflammatory topicals and creams. Studies have shown that beta-caryophyllene may reduce voluntary intake of alcohol in mice and could be used as a treatment for alcohol withdrawal symptoms.

This terpene is the most responsible for the recognizable marijuana smell with its spicy and floral notes. Linalool is also found in lavender, mint, cinnamon and coriander. Linalool has strong sedative and relaxing properties just like the aromatic herbs where it is found. Therapeutically, Linalool has been shown to exhibit anti-inflammatory, anti-epileptic, anti-stress, and anti-microbial properties. Finally, if you're looking for a natural mosquito repellant linalool has been shown to act as a strong mosquito deterrent.

Alpha-bisabolol (also known as levomenol and bisabolol) has a pleasant floral, peppery aroma and can also be found in chamomile flower and candeia tree. This terpene has primarily found its niche in the cosmetics industry, primarily owed to its anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and antioxidant properties.

α-humulene (formerly α-caryophyllene) is partially responsible for giving the plant its distinct spicy, herbaceous, and subtle floral aromas. Humulene can be found along with β-caryophyllene in plants such as basil, sage, hops, and clove. From a medical standpoint a 2016 study found that humulene may assist in termination of cancer cells when used in conjunction with phytocannabinoids and other terpenes. Humulene has been found to exhibit antibacterial properties and plays an important part in the lifecycle of the cannabis plant by deterring pests and preventing fungal infections.

Terpene Detail Thumnail

Caryophyllene

Best known for its spicy and peppery note, beta-caryophyllene is also found in black pepper, cinnamon, cloves, and spices like oregano, basil and rosemary. Beta-caryophyllene binds to CB2 receptors making it the only terpene that binds to your endocannabinoid receptors. Beta-caryophyllene has also found a niche in the medical and cosmetic industries as an ingredient in anti-inflammatory topicals and creams. Studies have shown that beta-caryophyllene may reduce voluntary intake of alcohol in mice and could be used as a treatment for alcohol withdrawal symptoms.

Terpene Detail Thumnail

Linalool

This terpene is the most responsible for the recognizable marijuana smell with its spicy and floral notes. Linalool is also found in lavender, mint, cinnamon and coriander. Linalool has strong sedative and relaxing properties just like the aromatic herbs where it is found. Therapeutically, Linalool has been shown to exhibit anti-inflammatory, anti-epileptic, anti-stress, and anti-microbial properties. Finally, if you're looking for a natural mosquito repellant linalool has been shown to act as a strong mosquito deterrent.

Terpene Detail Thumnail

bisabolol

Alpha-bisabolol (also known as levomenol and bisabolol) has a pleasant floral, peppery aroma and can also be found in chamomile flower and candeia tree. This terpene has primarily found its niche in the cosmetics industry, primarily owed to its anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and antioxidant properties.

Terpene Detail Thumnail

humulene

α-humulene (formerly α-caryophyllene) is partially responsible for giving the plant its distinct spicy, herbaceous, and subtle floral aromas. Humulene can be found along with β-caryophyllene in plants such as basil, sage, hops, and clove. From a medical standpoint a 2016 study found that humulene may assist in termination of cancer cells when used in conjunction with phytocannabinoids and other terpenes. Humulene has been found to exhibit antibacterial properties and plays an important part in the lifecycle of the cannabis plant by deterring pests and preventing fungal infections.