Green Cush (Flower)

Rating: 4.00/10
AKA:
Brand: wildlife
  • THC

    16 - 22%

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What is Green Cush?

With a sweet citrus aroma and notes of earth and wood, Green Cush is a smooth and fruity Afghani Skunk cross. This aromatic and resinous sativa dominant cultivar is appreciated for its potency as well as it's well-balanced terpene profile.


Terpene Profile

Terpene Thumnail

Caryophyllene

Best known for its spicy and peppery note, beta-caryophyllene is also found in black pepper, cinnamon, cloves, and spices like oregano, basil and rosemary. Beta-caryophyllene binds to CB2 receptors making it the only terpene that binds to your endocannabinoid receptors. Beta-caryophyllene has also found a niche in the medical and cosmetic industries as an ingredient in anti-inflammatory topicals and creams. Studies have shown that beta-caryophyllene may reduce voluntary intake of alcohol in mice and could be used as a treatment for alcohol withdrawal symptoms.

Terpene Thumnail

Myrcene

Myrcene is one of the most common terpenes found in cannabis and is also the most likely terpene to be dominant in a strain. This terpene has long been used for it's calming sedative effects; however, you will find Myrcene in similar concentrations in both Sativa and Indica dominant strains. You will recognize myrcene from it's peppery, spicy fragrance. It often reminds users of earthy, musky notes, resembling cloves and imparts flavours from floral tang to herbal musk. Myrcene is can also be found in thyme, mango, lemongrass, and hops.

Terpene Thumnail

Pinene

Alpha-pinene and Beta-pinene are often found together and are two of the more common terpenes found in cannabis. The aptly named Pinenes have a pine scent reminiscent of a fresh forest aroma. Alpha-pinene and beta-pinene are also naturally found in many conifer trees, rosemary, parsley, eucalyptus oil, and orange peel. These terpenes have long been used for their anti-inflammatory properties, additionally many users find that Alpha-pinene and Beta-pinene may help dilate the airways to assist with breathing and may amplify the anti-anxiety and pain relieving properties of other cannabinoids and terpenes found in cannabis. Finally, there is evidence that Alpha-pinene and Beta-pinene are able to easily pass the blood brain barrier and act as an inhibitor to acetylcolynesterase, this interaction prevents the destruction of molecules responsible for transmission of information (acetylcholine), resulting in memory improvement and could counteract some of the negative effects of THC which lead to a decrease in acetylcholine levels.

Best known for its spicy and peppery note, beta-caryophyllene is also found in black pepper, cinnamon, cloves, and spices like oregano, basil and rosemary. Beta-caryophyllene binds to CB2 receptors making it the only terpene that binds to your endocannabinoid receptors. Beta-caryophyllene has also found a niche in the medical and cosmetic industries as an ingredient in anti-inflammatory topicals and creams. Studies have shown that beta-caryophyllene may reduce voluntary intake of alcohol in mice and could be used as a treatment for alcohol withdrawal symptoms.

Myrcene is one of the most common terpenes found in cannabis and is also the most likely terpene to be dominant in a strain. This terpene has long been used for it's calming sedative effects; however, you will find Myrcene in similar concentrations in both Sativa and Indica dominant strains. You will recognize myrcene from it's peppery, spicy fragrance. It often reminds users of earthy, musky notes, resembling cloves and imparts flavours from floral tang to herbal musk. Myrcene is can also be found in thyme, mango, lemongrass, and hops.

Alpha-pinene and Beta-pinene are often found together and are two of the more common terpenes found in cannabis. The aptly named Pinenes have a pine scent reminiscent of a fresh forest aroma. Alpha-pinene and beta-pinene are also naturally found in many conifer trees, rosemary, parsley, eucalyptus oil, and orange peel. These terpenes have long been used for their anti-inflammatory properties, additionally many users find that Alpha-pinene and Beta-pinene may help dilate the airways to assist with breathing and may amplify the anti-anxiety and pain relieving properties of other cannabinoids and terpenes found in cannabis. Finally, there is evidence that Alpha-pinene and Beta-pinene are able to easily pass the blood brain barrier and act as an inhibitor to acetylcolynesterase, this interaction prevents the destruction of molecules responsible for transmission of information (acetylcholine), resulting in memory improvement and could counteract some of the negative effects of THC which lead to a decrease in acetylcholine levels.

Terpene Detail Thumnail

Caryophyllene

Best known for its spicy and peppery note, beta-caryophyllene is also found in black pepper, cinnamon, cloves, and spices like oregano, basil and rosemary. Beta-caryophyllene binds to CB2 receptors making it the only terpene that binds to your endocannabinoid receptors. Beta-caryophyllene has also found a niche in the medical and cosmetic industries as an ingredient in anti-inflammatory topicals and creams. Studies have shown that beta-caryophyllene may reduce voluntary intake of alcohol in mice and could be used as a treatment for alcohol withdrawal symptoms.

Terpene Detail Thumnail

Myrcene

Myrcene is one of the most common terpenes found in cannabis and is also the most likely terpene to be dominant in a strain. This terpene has long been used for it's calming sedative effects; however, you will find Myrcene in similar concentrations in both Sativa and Indica dominant strains. You will recognize myrcene from it's peppery, spicy fragrance. It often reminds users of earthy, musky notes, resembling cloves and imparts flavours from floral tang to herbal musk. Myrcene is can also be found in thyme, mango, lemongrass, and hops.

Terpene Detail Thumnail

Pinene

Alpha-pinene and Beta-pinene are often found together and are two of the more common terpenes found in cannabis. The aptly named Pinenes have a pine scent reminiscent of a fresh forest aroma. Alpha-pinene and beta-pinene are also naturally found in many conifer trees, rosemary, parsley, eucalyptus oil, and orange peel. These terpenes have long been used for their anti-inflammatory properties, additionally many users find that Alpha-pinene and Beta-pinene may help dilate the airways to assist with breathing and may amplify the anti-anxiety and pain relieving properties of other cannabinoids and terpenes found in cannabis. Finally, there is evidence that Alpha-pinene and Beta-pinene are able to easily pass the blood brain barrier and act as an inhibitor to acetylcolynesterase, this interaction prevents the destruction of molecules responsible for transmission of information (acetylcholine), resulting in memory improvement and could counteract some of the negative effects of THC which lead to a decrease in acetylcholine levels.

Gym Ready
Energetic

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Review By User

pardeep

4
09/04/21