Donkey Butter (Flower)

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AKA:
Brand: BC Black
  • THC

    23 - 27%

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What is Donkey Butter?

Donkey Butter, an indica dominant hybrid bred by Exotic Genetix is a cross of very potent Triple OG with Grease Monkey. This highly potent cultivar smells like diesel mixed with skunk, with dominant earthy notes and a pinene finish. The buds are olive green and purple, with the colour offset by a thick coating of silvery crystal trichomes and orange pistils. Donkey Butter is a speciality over at Black Kettle Farms, and connoisseurs will not be disappointed.


Terpene Profile

Terpene Thumnail

Caryophyllene

Best known for its spicy and peppery note, beta-caryophyllene is also found in black pepper, cinnamon, cloves, and spices like oregano, basil and rosemary. Beta-caryophyllene binds to CB2 receptors making it the only terpene that binds to your endocannabinoid receptors. Beta-caryophyllene has also found a niche in the medical and cosmetic industries as an ingredient in anti-inflammatory topicals and creams. Studies have shown that beta-caryophyllene may reduce voluntary intake of alcohol in mice and could be used as a treatment for alcohol withdrawal symptoms.

Terpene Thumnail

Farnesene

Farnesene is a blanket term for a group of chemically similar sesquiterpenes. In nature Farnesene acts as a natural pheromone to repel insects. Farnesene has been known to provide anti-inflammatory, calming, antispasmodic, antibacterial, antifungal, and sedative properties. Apple skin, ginger, hops, chamomile, and ylang-ylang are other natural sources of Farnesene.

Terpene Thumnail

Limonene

Just as the name sounds, limonene gives strains a citrusy smell that resembles lemons; which is no surprise as all citrus fruits contain large amounts of this compound. Therapeutically, limonene has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-stress, and possibly disease-preventing properties.

Best known for its spicy and peppery note, beta-caryophyllene is also found in black pepper, cinnamon, cloves, and spices like oregano, basil and rosemary. Beta-caryophyllene binds to CB2 receptors making it the only terpene that binds to your endocannabinoid receptors. Beta-caryophyllene has also found a niche in the medical and cosmetic industries as an ingredient in anti-inflammatory topicals and creams. Studies have shown that beta-caryophyllene may reduce voluntary intake of alcohol in mice and could be used as a treatment for alcohol withdrawal symptoms.

Farnesene is a blanket term for a group of chemically similar sesquiterpenes. In nature Farnesene acts as a natural pheromone to repel insects. Farnesene has been known to provide anti-inflammatory, calming, antispasmodic, antibacterial, antifungal, and sedative properties. Apple skin, ginger, hops, chamomile, and ylang-ylang are other natural sources of Farnesene.

Just as the name sounds, limonene gives strains a citrusy smell that resembles lemons; which is no surprise as all citrus fruits contain large amounts of this compound. Therapeutically, limonene has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-stress, and possibly disease-preventing properties.

Terpene Detail Thumnail

Caryophyllene

Best known for its spicy and peppery note, beta-caryophyllene is also found in black pepper, cinnamon, cloves, and spices like oregano, basil and rosemary. Beta-caryophyllene binds to CB2 receptors making it the only terpene that binds to your endocannabinoid receptors. Beta-caryophyllene has also found a niche in the medical and cosmetic industries as an ingredient in anti-inflammatory topicals and creams. Studies have shown that beta-caryophyllene may reduce voluntary intake of alcohol in mice and could be used as a treatment for alcohol withdrawal symptoms.

Terpene Detail Thumnail

Farnesene

Farnesene is a blanket term for a group of chemically similar sesquiterpenes. In nature Farnesene acts as a natural pheromone to repel insects. Farnesene has been known to provide anti-inflammatory, calming, antispasmodic, antibacterial, antifungal, and sedative properties. Apple skin, ginger, hops, chamomile, and ylang-ylang are other natural sources of Farnesene.

Terpene Detail Thumnail

Limonene

Just as the name sounds, limonene gives strains a citrusy smell that resembles lemons; which is no surprise as all citrus fruits contain large amounts of this compound. Therapeutically, limonene has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-stress, and possibly disease-preventing properties.